While there's no replacement for experiencing nature in real life, our new Armchair Naturalist corner is a place where kids can read about the latest news and stories about the fascinating world of wildlife and nature.

sea birds
HAKAI

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city owl
MNN

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blue whale
MNN

Until now, no one had managed to record the heart rate of a blue whale. But a team of U.S. researchers took the first recording of a blue whale's heart rate.

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Bird of paradise
AEON

During a 2016 trek to west New Guinea, biologist Ed Scholes of Cornell University in New York and the US nature photographer Tim Laman discovered a new species of bird of paradise. The species is now called the Vogelkop superb bird-of-paradise. Click through to the watch a video of the first known time that the male Vogelkop superb has been caught on camera doing its absolutely superb dance.

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coyote
MNN

A plastic jug that was likely left behind by campers nearly ended the life of a coyote who got stuck in it. It took a tedious effort of many concerned citizens and rescuers to help the animal,

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Great Horned Owl
MNN

The firefighters from the Ventura County Fire Department were on patrol in a eucalyptus grove in the Maria Fire zone looking for dangerous burnt-out trees when they spotted a great horned owl hopping around in the ashes. The crew approached the owl and wrapped up the owl to protect both the bird and himself.

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leopard
Time

A pair of researchers developed a footprint identification technique (FIT) and specialized software for researchers to track wildlife populations. A less intrusive substitute for radio collars, the technique can identify individual animals with 95% accuracy without getting up close or using camera traps.

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Seven Worlds, One Planet
Discover Wildlife

Seven Worlds, One Planet

Sir David Attenborough’s latest wildlife epic, Seven Worlds, One Planet, premiered on BBC One. The globe-trotting nature show spotlights the natural wonders in different continents each episode. It also reveals how each continent has evolved its unique flora and fauna, for at the heart of each film is geology and how the formation of the continents has profoundly influenced biological diversity across the entire planet.

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flying fox
Bat Conservation International

Global Bat Populations Need Conservation Action

Bat species around the world are threatened by a range of human-related activities and require expanded research and data collection for better protection. In a released paper titled “A review of the major threats and challenges to global bat conservation” in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, scientists from Bat Conservation International (BCI) scientists and Texas Tech University show that 80% of bat species require research or conservation attention.

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Giant salamander
Discover Wildlife

Newly described salamander in museum is the world’s largest amphibian

Researchers at London’s Natural History Museum have identified two brand new species of giant salamander using DNA taken from specimens collected in the early 20th century, one of which is thought to be the world’s biggest amphibian.

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Aye
Science Daily

Gimme six! Researchers discover aye-aye's extra finger

A study led by researchers from North Carolina State University has found that aye-ayes, extremely rare lemurs known for their constantly growing incisors, large ears, and strange hands -- particularly for the slender, elongated middle fingers that they use for locating and spearing grubs inside trees, possess small "pseudothumbs" -- complete with their own fingerprints -- that may help them grip objects and branches as they move through trees. This is the first accessory digit ever found in a primate.

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crab
Science Daily

Crabs can solve and remember their way around a maze

A new study has revealed how common shore crabs can navigate their way around a complex maze and can even remember the route in order to find food.

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Sleeping like a Weddell by Ralf Schneider
NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM, LONDON

Explore this year's Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition images

For 55 years, photographers have showcased their work in the Natural History Museum, London's Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition. You can explore this year's Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition images selected by a panel of international experts from almost 50,000 entries by the world's best photographers.

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humpback whales

/ Live Science

Watch Rare Footage of Whales Blowing 'Bubble Nets' to Capture Prey in a Vortex of Doom

Researchers captured rare footage of humpback whales blowing streams of spiraling bubbles to form "nets" of air around groups of the tiny marine creatures that the whales eat. The scientists used cameras flying overhead and attached to feeding whales in waters near southeastern Alaska.

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red squirrel
JOSH DAVIS / Natural History Museum of London

The state of nature: 41 per cent of the UK's species have declined since the 1970s

A new report has found that the UK's wildlife is continuing to crash, with hundreds of species at risk of disappearing. The report was compiled by scientists, researchers and conservationists from across the UK and has found that, over the past 50 years, urbanization, agriculture, pollution and climate change have all caused the nation's plants and animals to dwindle.

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fish
CHRISTIAN COTRONEO / MNN.com

Do fish feel pain?

A new study from the University of Liverpool has found that fish feel pain in a way that's "strikingly similar" to humans. In fact, like us, they hyperventilate and stop eating when they're hurting. They will even rub the part of their body that aches.

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zebra foal
KATIE STACEY / National Geographic

Rare polka-dotted zebra foal photographed in Kenya

A zebra foal named Tira with a dark coat and white polka dots was spotted in Kenya’s Masai Mara National Reserve by photographer Frank Liu. The foal has a condition called pseudomelanism, a rare genetic mutation in which animals display some sort of abnormality in their stripe pattern

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birds migration
MARY JO DILONARDO/ MNN.com

Why do birds migrate at night?

The majority of birds migrate at night. In this piece experts discuss the advantages of night migration to the bird including safety from predators and better air and temperature conditions.

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